CANIBD


The Canadian IBD Nurses (CANIBD) annual conference will be held in collaboration with the Canadian Society of Gastroenterology Nurses & Associates (CSGNA) and Crohn’s and Colitis Canada (CCC). Due to the virtual nature of this year’s events, we are holding the CANIBD conference the evening before the Meeting of the Minds conference. CANIBD will take place from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm EST on Thursday, November 5, 2020. In honour of the International Year of the Nurse and the Midwife, this year’s session will explore the evolution of IBD nursing over time.

 

IBD Nursing Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Thursday, November 5, 2020 - 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm EST

  • Nursing Forum (6:00 pm to 6:30 pm EST)

  • ​Plenary session (6:30 pm to 9:00 pm EST)

The Nursing Forum will provide an opportunity to highlight CANIBD member activities and successes during the past year.

​This Plenary session will feature international perspectives on the evolution of IBD nursing over time. Presenters will each describe the history of IBD nursing in their country, and highlight how these roles have changed. Presenters will discuss the role of virtual care, and best practices that have emerged – or been accelerated by – COVID-19.


Participants in this session will be able to:

  • Examine the evolution of IBD nursing roles in Canada and in the international com
  • Appreciate changes to IBD nursing scope of practice in four different jurisdictions
  • Observe the Allied health care provider response and contributions to the changing role of the IBD nurse​
  • Discuss and implement best practices in virtual care for IBD patients
  • Explore predictions for the future of IBD nursing

A CSGNA Community of Practice

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Our Story

Nurses are an important part of the multidisciplinary approach to managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Approximately 80 GI nurses across Canada have a primary role in IBD care (clinical inpatient and outpatient care, telephone advice, rapid access clinics, transition and biologic support). In 2015, CANIBD was created to advance mentoring and support for IBD nursing in Canada.

Our Vision

To ensure people of all ages living with IBD in Canada receive high quality clinical nursing care within the multidisciplinary team.

Our Mission

CANIBD is committed to improve the quality of care for people living with IBD. To this end, CANIBD:

  • Provides support and mentorship for IBD nurses in Canada
  • Provides and promotes learning opportunities for nurses
  • Provides opportunities for networking and sharing best practices in nursing care
  • Develops or adopts nursing guidelines, standards or consensus statement for IBD nursing in Canada
  • Elevates the profile of IBD nursing in Canada

Our Success

With funding support from industry partners and management support from Crohn’s and Colitis Canada, CANIBD has made great strides in moving its mission forward. Some key achievements include:

  • CANIBD Community of Practice established with CSGNA
  • Successful CANIBD Annual Conferences held
  • Nurses Travel Education Award launched and awarded
  • Nursing-led Research Grant launched and awarded
  • Advocacy training support initiated
  • Education and patient program supported, including nursing education webinars
  • CANIBD Scope of Practice Document
  • The strategic strategic priorities for 2019 are to:
    • Promote and develop IBD nursing care & education
    • Foster greater communication among IBD nursing network
    • Strengthen nursing-led IBD research
    • Support nursing-led advocacy for multidisciplinary teams in IBD care and access to treatments
    • Ensure sustainability of CANIBD nursing community

Registration

Join us on Thursday, November 5, 2020 for our CANIBD Conference.

REGISTER NOW!

  • Canada has among the highest incidence rates of Crohn's and colitis in the world.
  • 1 in 140 Canadians lives with Crohn’s or colitis.
  • Families new to Canada are developing these diseases for the first time.
  • Incidence of Crohn’s in Canadian kids under 10 has doubled since 1995.
  • People are most commonly diagnosed before age 30.