Canada Future Directions in IBD

 

Canada Future Directions in IBD is Crohn’s and Colitis Canada’s premier conference for healthcare professionals and researchers who care for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) and carry out research into these disorders.

One of the goals of Canada Future Directions in IBD is to present the best new scientific research in IBD and advance knowledge on the state of the science. Crohn’s and Colitis Canada’s Promise Statement and Mission Statement emphasize our long-term commitment to finding cures for Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis as well as our commitment to undertakings that will have a more immediate impact on the lives of Canadian children and adults affected by these chronic diseases. 

Our Promise: To cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and improve the lives of children and adults affected by these chronic diseases.

Our Mission:  Crohn’s and Colitis Canada will raise funds to:

  • Invest in IBD research to foster advances in prevention, treatments, cure, and health policy;
  • Educate patients, families, industry and government about IBD;
  • Increase public awareness of IBD and Crohn’s and Colitis Canada; and
  • Advocate to governments and stakeholders on behalf of those affected by IBD.
Knowledge translation is important to delivering on our Promise. Now in its ninth year, the Canada Future Directions in IBD national symposium remains one of our key programs to translate what is learned in research into the hands of the practitioners treating IBD patients and to highlight the significant progress being made by our funded researchers.

Again this year, Canada Future Directions in IBD hosts the Canadian IBD Nurses (CANIBD) Annual Conference held in collaboration with the Canadian Society of Gastroenterology Nurses & Associates (CSGNA). This educational initiative provides nurses with a tailored program to meeting their evolving needs.

  • Canada has among the highest incidence rates of Crohn's and colitis in the world.
  • 1 in 140 Canadians lives with Crohn’s or colitis.
  • Families new to Canada are developing these diseases for the first time.
  • Incidence of Crohn’s in Canadian kids under 10 has doubled since 1995.
  • People are most commonly diagnosed before age 30.